WWII Ration Week: Day One


Welcome to Day 1 of my WWII Rationing Week. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, I highly suggest you read this post.

Let’s start by looking at what I consumed throughout the day

Breakfast
– Porridge made from whole grain rolled oats and sweetened with sultanas
– Tea

Morning Tea
– Grapes
– Tea with milk

Lunch
– ‘Everything In’ Stew.
Essentially this was chuck steak and whatever vegetables I felt like. This is a great and easy dish because it’s designed to use up whatever leftover vegetables or meat you have in the fridge.
– A piece of wholemeal bread.

Afternoon Tea

– Homemade ANZAC Biscuit
– Tea

Dinner
– Leftover stew
– A piece of wholemeal bread.

I think Day 1 went incredibly well. This is hardly surprising considering that I had a lot of supplies to work with. However, I did ensure that I stayed in a ‘waste not, want not’ mindset in order to make life a little easier later in the week. Here a few ways in which I did this:

– The chuck steak that I used for my stew had an incredibly high fat to meat ratio. As a cheaper cut this is hardly surprising. Instead of throwing away the fat-riddled meat, I kept it, along with my vegetable cuttings to use for stock later in the week
– I also kept the drippings from when I fried the steak. This is going to be quite important later when I start running low on butter and cooking oil

Yesterday I mentioned that I don’t use a great deal of butter or sugar and claimed that I would have absolutely no problem with them being rationed.

Wrong.

You may have noticed that I mentioned making ANZAC Biscuits. They turned out incredibly well, however, they also made me fly through roughly half my butter and sugar rations for the week. As such, judging from some of the other dessert recipes I want to try, I’m only going to have enough for one more sweet treat. I will also need to get a little more creative when ordinary recipes call for butter.

To finish off today’s entry I thought I would share my ANZAC Biscuit recipe with you. For all of you non-Australian or New Zealanders, these biscuits became popular with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACS) during WWI. They were renowned for their durability and long life,  which was perfect for families to send to soldiers fighting over the other side of the world.

My poorly photographed ANZAC Bicuits

Ingredients

1 cup flour
(I used wholemeal. This was the standard fare during WWII)
1 Cup sugar
(I used brown because it’s what happened to be in my cupboard)

1 cup desiccated coconut
1 cup rolled oats
125g butter/margarine
1 tbs golden syrup
(I used maple syrup. I will justify this because it’s what I had in my cupboard and it therefore saved me having to go and buy a whole other product. Although this may take away some authenticity, it’s adhering to the practice of making do with what one had in order to save money)
2 tbs boiling water
1 tsp bicarb soda

Method

Mix the flour, sugar and coconut together

Mix the syrup/treacle and butter together and warm gently until thoroughly mixed.

Mix the boiling water and bicarbonate of soda together and add to the syrup/butter mixture and mix in well

Add the wet mix into the dry mix and bind together

Drop teaspoons of the mixture onto a lightly greased tray or parchment paper and cook for 10 minutes at 180C, or until golden brown all over

Remove and leave to cool for 10 minutes before placing on a wire rack to finish cooling

Eat!

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5 thoughts on “WWII Ration Week: Day One

  1. How much of your tea ration did you end up using over 3 cups?
    And good job on saving the meat and veggie off-cuts for stock! My nan would be proud!!

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