WWII Ration Week: Day One


Welcome to Day 1 of my WWII Rationing Week. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, I highly suggest you read this post.

Let’s start by looking at what I consumed throughout the day

Breakfast
– Porridge made from whole grain rolled oats and sweetened with sultanas
– Tea

Morning Tea
– Grapes
– Tea with milk

Lunch
– ‘Everything In’ Stew.
Essentially this was chuck steak and whatever vegetables I felt like. This is a great and easy dish because it’s designed to use up whatever leftover vegetables or meat you have in the fridge.
– A piece of wholemeal bread.

Afternoon Tea

– Homemade ANZAC Biscuit
– Tea

Dinner
– Leftover stew
– A piece of wholemeal bread.

I think Day 1 went incredibly well. This is hardly surprising considering that I had a lot of supplies to work with. However, I did ensure that I stayed in a ‘waste not, want not’ mindset in order to make life a little easier later in the week. Here a few ways in which I did this:

– The chuck steak that I used for my stew had an incredibly high fat to meat ratio. As a cheaper cut this is hardly surprising. Instead of throwing away the fat-riddled meat, I kept it, along with my vegetable cuttings to use for stock later in the week
– I also kept the drippings from when I fried the steak. This is going to be quite important later when I start running low on butter and cooking oil

Yesterday I mentioned that I don’t use a great deal of butter or sugar and claimed that I would have absolutely no problem with them being rationed.

Wrong.

You may have noticed that I mentioned making ANZAC Biscuits. They turned out incredibly well, however, they also made me fly through roughly half my butter and sugar rations for the week. As such, judging from some of the other dessert recipes I want to try, I’m only going to have enough for one more sweet treat. I will also need to get a little more creative when ordinary recipes call for butter.

To finish off today’s entry I thought I would share my ANZAC Biscuit recipe with you. For all of you non-Australian or New Zealanders, these biscuits became popular with the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZACS) during WWI. They were renowned for their durability and long life,  which was perfect for families to send to soldiers fighting over the other side of the world.

My poorly photographed ANZAC Bicuits

Ingredients

1 cup flour
(I used wholemeal. This was the standard fare during WWII)
1 Cup sugar
(I used brown because it’s what happened to be in my cupboard)

1 cup desiccated coconut
1 cup rolled oats
125g butter/margarine
1 tbs golden syrup
(I used maple syrup. I will justify this because it’s what I had in my cupboard and it therefore saved me having to go and buy a whole other product. Although this may take away some authenticity, it’s adhering to the practice of making do with what one had in order to save money)
2 tbs boiling water
1 tsp bicarb soda

Method

Mix the flour, sugar and coconut together

Mix the syrup/treacle and butter together and warm gently until thoroughly mixed.

Mix the boiling water and bicarbonate of soda together and add to the syrup/butter mixture and mix in well

Add the wet mix into the dry mix and bind together

Drop teaspoons of the mixture onto a lightly greased tray or parchment paper and cook for 10 minutes at 180C, or until golden brown all over

Remove and leave to cool for 10 minutes before placing on a wire rack to finish cooling

Eat!

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Cocktail Party: The Zombie


On Friday night some friends and I went out to celebrate the birthday of Bethany from The Kitchening. Because our town is a cesspool for human misery, there is only one decent cocktail bar worth going to.

My drink of choice for the evening was The Zombie, and this was for a number of important and well thought out reasons. Firstly, it contains a shameful amount of rum and was therefore an intelligent choice both economically and fiscally. Secondly, the bartender was setting those bad boys on fire, and what’s not to love about that?

It was during the inevitable haze of my second round that I got to thinking about how
I had only discovered the existence of The Zombie a few short years ago. Furthermore, I knew absolutely nothing about its origin. It was at that point that I firmly decided that the matter was in dire need of investigation. In the morning. Maybe the following afternoon. After a greasy breakfast.

So here we are, you reading patiently and me continuing to shamelessly ride the coat tails of the recent Zombie Apocalypse craze.

I do have some exciting news before we begin though! Instead of one cocktail origin story, I am going to provide you with an entire weeks worth! That’s right, seven posts in seven days. You’re welcome.

So without further ado, let’s get this cocktail party started.

Warning: Contains enough rum to put a pirate ship to shame

The invention of The Zombie is widely attributed to Donn Beach aka Donn the Beachcomber. Beach is famous for being the founding father of the Tiki Bar craze of the 1930s in the USA. FYI, I would do some truly unthinkable things for the opportunity to go back to that era.

Legend has it that the original Zombie was concocted by Beach in 1934 to help a hung-over customer get through a business meeting. The customer supposedly returned several days later to complain that the drink had turned him into to a zombie for the entirety of the meeting. Thus, a cocktail was born.

The customer’s reaction is understandable to anyone who has indulged in the infamous concoction. Much like the Long Island Iced Tea, the smooth and fruity taste of The Zombie works to conceal its extremely high alcohol content. This dangerous mix makes for an incredibly intoxicating beverage, in both senses of the word.

Beach was very cautious with the recipes of his cocktails. The mixing instructions for his bartenders contained coded references to ingredients, the contents of which were only known to him. Because Beach kept his recipe a secret as well as occasionally altering it, there are many variations of the Zombie being made today. Many of these bear little resemblance to the original cocktail.

Now that we’ve had a little bit of history, I thought I would add one of the more common recipes for those of you playing at home.

Ingredients

15ml Bacardi 151 rum
30ml dark rum
30ml light rum
30ml golden rum
15ml apricot brandy
30ml pineapple juice
30ml orange juice
30ml lime juice
1 tsp sugar

In conclusion – buy a whole lot of rum.

Method

Shake all ingredients with ice except the Bacardi. Pour into a hurricane glass. Float Bacardi rum on top. Garnish with a fruit slice, sprig of mint and a cherry.

Alternatively, you can copy my bartenders method:

After shaking and pouring all of the ingredients, excluding the Bacardi, take a passionfruit half and remove the pulp. Half fill with brown sugar and pour in the Bacardi. Float the passionfruit half in the top of the cocktail and set on fire. Marvel at how awesome it looks. Blow out the flame. Drink!

See you all next time.